Category Archives: Free Maths Resources

Decimal Addition Worksheets – No Carrying

Adding decimal numbers is very much like adding numbers without decimal points. You add each column of numbers, starting with the rightmost column. If you have to “carry 1″, that goes into the next column on the left.

The trick with adding numbers with decimal points is to make sure that the decimal point is in the correct place in your answer. A good tip is to follow the point down and put it in the answer box first, even before starting the sum.

These decimal additions don’t require you to do any carrying and are relatively easy.

Shopping Worksheets

These shopping worksheets were so popular that we made some more! The ones that you can download on this page are a little harder than the first ones, though. All the exercises provided use the pounds sterling (GBP) currency. If your native currency is something else, you could quite easily use these worksheets in a diversity project.

How Many Can You Buy?

Shopping requires very specific maths skills that children will use over and over again, so it’s important that they get the chance to practise them properly. When they shop, they need to accumulate the sum of multiple items that usually have different prices. That’s hard enough, but then they need to subtract that number from whatever money they give to the cashier to calculate their change. So, common tasks involved in shopping are:

  • adding different numbers together to keep a running total.
  • performing comparisons of the running total with their budget to determine whether they have enough money to buy everything they want.
  • subtracting the final total from the money they hand over to the cashier to calculate their change.

It sound complicated when we say it like that, doesn’t it!

Time Questions Worksheets

You can’t get by from day to day without being able to tell the time. It’s surprising just how far the concept of time pervades our daily life. From being woken up at a specific time by our alarm clocks to making arrangements to see friends at a particular time to knowing when the local swimming pool closes – the idea of time is everywhere.

These time worksheets display questions such as where will the big hand be on the clock face at various times, how many minutes are there in an hour, how many hours are there in a day, how many days are there in a year etc. The “where will the big hand be” style of questions also display a clock face to help the students work out what the answer is.

Clock Face With Minutes

Time Worksheets

There are different skills children need to develop to be able to tell the time properly. If someone tells them a time, they need to know where the hands on an analogue clock should be. For example, if you arrange to meet someone at 9:30 in the morning, you need to know that the small hand points between the 9 and 10 and that the bigger hand points to the 6.

The other side of the coin is looking at your watch or a clock to discover what the current time is. You need to recognise that when the small hand points to 10 and  the bigger hand points to 2, that it’s 10:10.

And to complicate matters, there are digital watches and clocks! And 24 hour time!

Draw The Hands On The Clock Worksheets

Draw The Hands On The Clock

The following time worksheets all display a blank clock face and a written time, and the children have to draw the hands on the clock to match the time. They start off easy (o’ clock) and get progressively harder (quarter to).

Write The Time Worksheets

Write The Time

The following time worksheets all display clocks with hour and minutes hands on them, and the children have to write down the time that each one indicates. They start off easy (o’ clock) and get progressively harder (quarter to).

Money Worksheets – 1

It’s important for kids to learn the value of money, and these money worksheets help them do just that. These worksheets use pounds sterling (GBP) as the currency, so if your native currency is different you might consider using the materials here in something like a diversity project.

Money Worksheets

The above worksheets all use the Microsoft Word 2010 format, but in case you don’t have that, the following worksheets can be opened with Word 97 – 2003:

Match Words With Numbers

This is a fun exercise that involves the children drawing a line between the word representation of a number and the number itself. For example, eight and 8 are equivalent, so a line needs drawing between the two, like this:

Match Words With Numbers

It’s useful to have an understanding of how you write numbers as words, and this exercise provides a good way to practise recognising the two forms.

The worksheets get increasingly difficult as the child progresses from one to 3 (see what we did there?)

The worksheets above all use Word 2010. “What if we don’t have Word 2010?” I hear you cry! Don’t worry, you can use these Word 97 – 2003 versions:

Subtraction With Decomposition Worksheets

These worksheets are for your students to practice their subtraction and unlike these examples, they do involve decomposition (borrowing from the left hand column). These worksheets are free to download, so you can save them to your hard drive and use them at school if you’re a teacher, or practise with your kids at home.

Subtraction With Decomposition – Tens And Units

These subtractions use numbers with tens and units, and look like this:

Subtraction With Decomposition - Tens And Units

Subtraction With Decomposition – Hundreds, Tens And Units

These subtractions use numbers with hundreds, tens and units, and look like this:

Subtraction With Decomposition - Hundreds, Tens And Units

The above worksheets were made using Word 2010, but we realise that not everybody has that version. Therefore, we’ve created Word 97 – 2003 versions below:

Tens And Units

Hundreds, Tens and Units

Subtraction – No Decomposition Worksheets

These worksheets are for your students to practice their subtraction and they don’t involve decomposition (borrowing from the left hand column). These worksheets are free to download, so you can save them to your hard drive and use them at school if you’re a teacher, or practise with your kids at home.

Subtraction Without Decomposition – Tens And Units

These subtractions use numbers with tens and units, and look like this:

Subtraction, No Decomposition, Tens And Units

Subtraction Without Decomposition – Hundreds, Tens And Units

These subtractions use numbers with hundreds, tens and units, and look like this:

For all those who don’t have Word 2010 (the above worksheets were made in Word 2010), we’ve got versions for Word 97 – 2003, too:

Tens and Units

Hundreds, Tens and Units

Simple Subtraction Worksheets

These very simple subtractions involve a collection of objects. The child has to cross out some of the objects and write down how many are left.

Simple Subtraction

The worksheets are graded in difficulty so that in the first worksheet the child has to cross out 1 object, in the second they have to cross out 2 objects and so on.

In the second batch of subtraction worksheets, 2 groups of objects are displayed and the child has to take the second away from the first. In the example below, the child has to take away 1 bucket from 2 buckets, leaving 1 bucket. As you can see, there are numbers above each group of objects, to help associate the pictures with a numerical value.

Simple Subtraction

In some worksheets, there is no pictorial representation of a number, so the child might have to subtract the number 2 from 3 buckets.

More variations on the theme of subtraction:

All the above worksheets were created in Word 2010. For all those readers who use older versions of Word, the following can be opened in Word 97 – 2003: